Scott Shannon, MD, assistant clinical professor at the University of Colorado, recently sifted through patient charts from his four-doctor practice to document CBD’s effects on anxiety. His study, as yet unpublished, found “a fairly rapid decrease in anxiety scores that appears to persist for months,” he says. But he says he can’t discount a placebo effect, especially since “there’s a lot of hype right now.”
Some additional positive news happened in June 2018, the Food and Drug Administration approved the first CBD-derived drug — Epidiolex, which contains purified CBD — to treat certain childhood seizure syndromes. Very promising findings and many are interested in long term effects. It’s likely that CBD will be used to treat other medical conditions in the near future.
“All parts of the plant Cannabis sativa L., whether growing or not; the seeds thereof; the resin extracted from any part of such plant; and every compound manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of such plant, its seeds or resins; but shall not include the mature stalks of such plant fiber produced from such stalks oil or cake made from the seeds of such plant, any other compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of such mature stalks (except the resin extracted therefrom),fiber, oil or cake, or the sterilized seed of such plant which is incapable of germination.”
Pharmacology published a study in 2016 looking at medical marijuana for migraines, specifically in relation to its effects on serotonin, with very positive results. You’ll notice that neither study looked at CBD in isolation from other cannabinoids (which is an issue with a lot of research on CBD and pain). Truthfully, the research on CBD alone just isn’t sufficient to make any pronouncements about its effects on headache pain.

First… hemp, cannabis, marijuana (slang term)… they’re from the exact same plant species – Cannabis sativa. It’s common to mistake hemp and cannabis unless you know why they’re different. The easiest way to tell? If it’s under .3% THC content then it’s hemp and is classified as legal for academic and educational purposes, according to federal law. What is commonly referred to as cannabis (or medical marijuana) contains THC levels above .3% and can extend into levels between 15-30% THC. Remember, THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) is the psychoactive component of cannabis. Without these higher THC levels, there are no psychoactive effects for you.


At first, I was wary. Although I live in Los Angeles, where it seems like there’s a medical marijuana depot on every corner, I’m not one for doing drugs (legal or otherwise). I mean, I don’t even take Advil when I get a headache!  But despite the fact that CBD oil is made from hemp, it doesn’t contain THC. THC is the compound responsible for the “high” that comes with ingesting marijuana. In fact, scientific reviews have proven that CBD “does not interfere with several psychomotor and psychological functions,” and is safe to ingest without any side effects. Let me repeat: YOU WILL NOT GET HIGH FROM CBD!
In 1970, the U.S. government passed the Controlled Substances Act, a statute that regulates all cannabis, including industrial hemp. However, the definition of marijuana was lifted from the existing 1937 statute and adopted without any change. This definition excluded certain parts of hemp — sterilized hemp seed, hemp fiber, and hemp seed oil — from regulation.
The Texas Controlled Substances Act is codified under Texas Health and Safety Code Chapter 481. Health and Safety Code Section 481.032 says that the Commissioner of State Health Services is to set out what substances are deemed Controlled Substances in Texas under Schedules I through V. Chapter 481.034 retains the right for the legislature to remove substances from the Controlled Substance list.
people don’t use CBD for recreational use. it has little to no THC so has no psychoactive properties. many CBD products processed from hemp also do not have enough CBD to affect any medical disorders either. they are just jumping on the trendy CBD bandwagon, like many other so-called “nutritional supplements”. so it is very difficult to find and trust the CBD processed form hemp. useful CBD from hemp can only be processed from the flowers, which is still illegal, even though no THC. the only legal use of hemp in the states is for “industrial” use, only the stalks and seeds (fiber and oil). the stalks and seeds of hemp are so lacking in usable CBD that it is not legitimate for medical use.

Tinctures – Typically tinctures are small glass or plastic “dropper” bottles that have cannabidiol oil mixed with a preserving solution such as alcohol. Tinctures were very a very common way to ingest botanical oils prior to the industrial revolution and are experiencing a resurgence in popularity as more people are looking for natural remedies. Tinctures with droppers allow you to put a few drops in your tea, under your tongue, or to bake the oil directly into your food.

×