CO2 extraction is one of the most common ways CBD is extracted from the hemp or cannabis plants. This method uses expensive equipment that adjusts temperature and pressure to extract the cannabinoids from the plant material, without damaging them. The other common method is to use solvents like ethanol or butane to extract the plant material. These solvents have to be burned off the final product which may damage the cannabinoids or terpenes in the process. There is also a risk that these solvents may not have burned off completely and could end up in your end product.

A study published by David Cheng, Postdoctoral Scientist, Neuroscience Research, University of New South Wales, NSW, Australia, says that CBD has a potential as a preventive measure against symptoms of Alzheimer’s. This presents yet another exciting development for medical researchers, given the persistent challenges to finding effective solutions for this condition.


While in all of these states recreational marijuana remains illegal, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Ohio and Rhode Island have all decriminalized the drug. In these states, having smaller amounts of marijuana on you won't lead to an arrest or a criminal record. The maximum amount you're allowed to have on your person will vary by state.
people don’t use CBD for recreational use. it has little to no THC so has no psychoactive properties. many CBD products processed from hemp also do not have enough CBD to affect any medical disorders either. they are just jumping on the trendy CBD bandwagon, like many other so-called “nutritional supplements”. so it is very difficult to find and trust the CBD processed form hemp. useful CBD from hemp can only be processed from the flowers, which is still illegal, even though no THC. the only legal use of hemp in the states is for “industrial” use, only the stalks and seeds (fiber and oil). the stalks and seeds of hemp are so lacking in usable CBD that it is not legitimate for medical use.
The passing of SB 218 through the Kentucky legislature created a new subsection of KRS 260.850m to 260.289, in which the Industrial Hemp Advisory Board outlines the purpose of an industrial hemp research program, establish license provisions, and create new requirements and license application procedures. This state’s approach is for the potential medical and industrial applications.
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