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Featuring the same benefits as our pure RSHO™ hemp oil in a reduced potency, another of our midrange products, RSHO™ liquid, contains 31 mg of CBD per serving. Available in Green, Blue, and Gold Label oils, RSHO™ liquid combines our flagship RSHO™ with medium chain triglyceride (MCT) oil derived from wholesome coconut oil and sustainably sourced palm oil. Unlike RSHO™ pure hemp oils, RSHO™ liquid doesn’t need to be refrigerated, making it convenient to store wherever you need it most.
Although several clinical studies focused on the health effects of CBD, the results available so far were not enough to convince the FDA to approve it as a drug. The FDA does not agree with its use as a dietary supplement either, but as long as sellers publish the appropriate disclaimers (like those on the CBDPure website and labels), it’s not up to them.
The vast majority of CBD oils come in bottles measuring either 15 milliliters (mL), or 0.5 ounces; or 30 mL, or 1 ounce. However, CBD concentration is more important than bottle size. Concentration refers to the ratio of hemp oil solution (measured in mL) compared to the amount of CBD cannabinoid (measured in milligrams, or mg). A 15-mL bottle may contain 100 mg of CBD, 300 mg, 500 mg, or more. The higher the mg amount, the stronger the CBD oil will be. For this reason, the ‘mg’ measurement is also referred to as the oil’s strength; i.e., 400-mg oil might be called 400-strength oil.
Extraction: The method by which CBD oil is processed from hemp plants can be very telling. Some manufacturers extract and process the oil using toxic materials like propane or butane; in most cases, these oils are cheaply priced. Safer extraction and processing agents include ethanol, which cleans the hemp plant of unwanted toxins; and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction, which strips harmful materials from the plant by changing the carbon dioxide’s temperature and pressure settings.
The interest and preference for botanical remedies such as CBD oil over harsh pharmaceuticals are growing rapidly. You can read scientific research on the promise of CBD Oil at NCBI. While North America is taking the lead legalizing cannabis and hemp the rest of the world is starting to question their stance on prohibition because of the undeniable benefits. While all talk about plant-based remedies may seem very new, using cannabis/hemp tinctures as a holistic remedy is a generations-old tradition. It was very common to use tinctures of cannabis oil in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. We are enjoying a renaissance in ancestral health where we are open again to remedies that were all but forgotten about in the mad race to make medicines a pill offered by a faceless often unaccountable corporation.
Currently, the only CBD product approved by the Food and Drug Administration is a prescription oil called Epidiolex. It's approved to treat two types of epilepsy. Aside from Epidiolex, state laws on the use of CBD vary. While CBD is being studied as a treatment for a wide range of conditions, including Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, diabetes, multiple sclerosis and anxiety, research supporting the drug's benefits is still limited.
Lisa Hamilton, a jeweler and doula in Brooklyn, NY, knows about the side effects. She recently tried CBD for the shoulder pain that plagued her five years after an accident. Her doctor certified that she was in chronic pain, which under New York State law allowed her to buy from a state dispensary. One Friday, she swallowed two 10-mg capsules, the amount recommended at the dispensary, then took another two on Saturday. “By Sunday, it felt like I’d gotten hit by a truck. Every muscle and joint ached,” Hamilton says. She cut back to one pill a day the following week, but still felt hungover. She stopped after that.
Some CBD manufacturers have come under government scrutiny for wild, indefensible claims, such that CBD is a cure-all for cancer, which it is not. We need more research but CBD may be prove to be an option for managing anxiety, insomnia, and chronic pain. Without sufficient high-quality evidence in human studies we can’t pinpoint effective doses, and because CBD is currently is mostly available as an unregulated supplement, it’s difficult to know exactly what you are getting. If you decide to try CBD, talk with your doctor — if for no other reason than to make sure it won’t affect other medications you are taking.
A major theme when reviewing the research on the best CBD for pain is the need for more large-scale clinical trials on CBD in isolation from other cannabinoids like THC. That’s not to say that THC is bad. It’s developed a stigma because it makes you high, which makes people think of hippies and the sixties and maybe your perennially stoned neighbor who clearly doesn’t have his stuff together. But THC also comes with a pretty respectable list of benefits. These range from antiemetic (anti-nausea) and anti-inflammatory effects to appetite stimulation.
I have to agree with Tanya. The higher the mg in the bottle, the fewer drops you take to equal the smaller dose from a lower mg bottle. Right? I actually clicked this article hoping to find info about actual CBD content. I read a COA report for a brand out of CO that said it is .6% CBD. That seems way low. But I know nothing about this stuff yet. I used to just smoke regular ole weed back when a quarter ounce cost $25 and based my choice on smell and appearance… or availability…. I feel like I need to be a little more scientific now.
Find the right CBD to THC ratio for you. Some people enjoy the high that THC provides, while others feel undesirably “out of it” when they use products with significant amounts of THC. No single ratio works for everyone, so experiment with a few different ones until you feel that the product you’re using is working well and helping you. You can also choose a ratio based on what you’re hoping to achieve with the use of CBD oil.[7]
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