Ranging from irritating to debilitating, joint pain can be tricky to treat. If your pain is mild, ibuprofen or acetaminophen might be adequate. But the worse it gets, the more likely you are to be prescribed antidepressants, muscle relaxants, or even opioids. Because of the side effects associated with these prescription medications, there has been quite a bit of research on CBD and joint pain — with promising results. Here are a few studies that point to CBD’s potential:
Hemp oil does have a number of uses and is often marketed as a cooking oil or a product that is good for moisturizing the skin. It is also used in the production of certain soaps, shampoos, and foods. It is also a basic ingredient for bio-fuel and even a more sustainable form of plastic. Hemp has been cultivated and used for roughly 10,000 years, and it definitely has useful purposes. However, a lack of cannabinoids, namely CBD, means that it has little therapeutic value.
Sub-lingual CBD drops have helped me enormously with sleeping and with radiation damage pain. I have a cancer that spread from the pelvic area to my sacrum and sciatic nerve and whilst the chemo and radiotherapy saved my life I have been taking MST (morphine derivative) for nerve pain ever since. My tumours are presently all quiet and last March I decided I wanted to stop taking the pain relief drugs, fearing dementia. CBD oil was recommended by my son who has arthritis and, for me, it really works. It’s so good to read an article that isn’t put out by a CBD sales site – I wish it could be properly prescribed and regulated (I’m in the UK) in order to have confidence with purity and dosage.
When it comes to using CBD, questions keep coming up, especially from people who try CBD for the first time. Since there are different CBD products and because CBD can be used in different ways, the question of how to use CBD oil is quite legitimate.  What CBD products are available, how they can be used, and the bioavailability of each product is covered in this article.
Squeeze the dropper top to fill the pipette with oil and dispense the oil under your tongue. You can swish it around a little, but most people like to just let it sit (that way you avoid some of the hemp taste — albeit Tasty Drops actually tastes great if you choose a flavored version). You can add as many droppers full as needed; don’t feel you need to restrict yourself to the recommended serving size. The phytocannabinoids in our proprietary blend is non-psychoactive. However, many people have noted a slight sedative effect at larger quantities. This may be beneficial if you have trouble sleeping, so consider using it before bed.
The interest and preference for botanical remedies such as CBD oil over harsh pharmaceuticals are growing rapidly. You can read scientific research on the promise of CBD Oil at NCBI. While North America is taking the lead legalizing cannabis and hemp the rest of the world is starting to question their stance on prohibition because of the undeniable benefits. While all talk about plant-based remedies may seem very new, using cannabis/hemp tinctures as a holistic remedy is a generations-old tradition. It was very common to use tinctures of cannabis oil in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. We are enjoying a renaissance in ancestral health where we are open again to remedies that were all but forgotten about in the mad race to make medicines a pill offered by a faceless often unaccountable corporation.
Since 2014, NuLeaf Naturals – our Editor’s Pick – has been committed to creating high-quality CBD oil products. As one of the oldest and most reviewed companies in the industry, NuLeaf Naturals has established themselves as a trustworthy CBD manufacturer. All of their products are tested by third party labs and their cannabinoid profile is impressive. They offer a unique range of concentrations for their organic CBD products ranging from 240mg to 4,850mg.

CBD has been in the news before, as a possible treatment for epilepsy. Research is still in its early days. Researchers are testing how much CBD is able to reduce the number of seizures in people with epilepsy, as well as how safe it is. The American Epilepsy Society states that cannabidiol research offers hope for seizure disorders, and that research is currently being conducted to better understand safe use.

In addition to an unflavored option, the drops also come in peppermint and goji berry flavors that are perfect for mixing with beverages. The nutritional information for all three flavors is found on the PlusCBD Oil website. The drops are fairly inexpensive, priced at $0.15 per mg or lower depending on the concentration. The brand offers fast shipping throughout the U.S. and to a wide range of international destinations. 

CBD is readily obtainable in most parts of the United States, though its exact legal status is in flux. All 50 states have laws legalizing CBD with varying degrees of restriction, and while the federal government still considers CBD in the same class as marijuana, it doesn’t habitually enforce against it. In December 2015, the FDA eased the regulatory requirements to allow researchers to conduct CBD trials. Currently, many people obtain CBD online without a medical cannabis license. The government’s position on CBD is confusing, and depends in part on whether the CBD comes from hemp or marijuana. The legality of CBD is expected to change, as there is currently bipartisan consensus in Congress to make the hemp crop legal which would, for all intents and purposes, make CBD difficult to prohibit.

Although CBD oils aren’t regulated by the FDA, purchasing products stateside from one of the nine states where recreational and medical cannabis use is legal will likely result in a higher-quality product than buying one made with hemp-derived CBD oil imported from abroad, says Martin Lee, director of Project CBD, a nonprofit that promotes medical research into CBD.
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