Several weeks after a hysterectomy last spring, Bo Roth was suffering from exhaustion and pain that kept her on the couch much of the day. The 58-year-old Seattle speech coach didn’t want to take opioid pain-killers, but Tylenol wasn’t helping enough. Roth was intrigued when women in her online chat group enthused about a cannabis-derived oil called cannabidiol (CBD) that they said relieved pain without making them high. So Roth, who hadn’t smoked weed since college but lived in a state where cannabis was legal, walked into a dispensary and bought a CBD tincture.
So, what is the best way to use CBD oil? CBD comes in a variety of forms, such as oil, tincture, oil for vaping, sublingual spray, edibles, and topical creams, so you can choose the method that is most suitable for your use. The main idea behind all the methods of using CBD is to make sure that this cannabinoid ends up in your system in an easy manner, producing the results you want. But when it comes to choosing the right method, it depends very much on the optimal dose in your case, the results you wish to achieve, and how long you want its effects to last. So, there isn’t a general rule when it comes to using CBD products.
This oil is available in concentrations ranging from 250mg to 5,000mg. Prices fall between $0.05 and $0.08 per mg, making the product very inexpensive compared to similar oils and tinctures from other brands. Customers who order the drops directly from CBDistillery may return the product for a full refund. Free shipping is available for U.S. orders of $75 or more.
Hemp oil does have a number of uses and is often marketed as a cooking oil or a product that is good for moisturizing the skin. It is also used in the production of certain soaps, shampoos, and foods. It is also a basic ingredient for bio-fuel and even a more sustainable form of plastic. Hemp has been cultivated and used for roughly 10,000 years, and it definitely has useful purposes. However, a lack of cannabinoids, namely CBD, means that it has little therapeutic value.
This method proved successful for years, but high-strength concentrates would sometimes crystallise and clog the very small orifice through which the oil was to be delivered. Recognising the issue and the fact that most customers needed a higher dose to be delivered quickly, CannabiGold further developed its packaging to launch a side nozzle. This pump can deliver a higher dose of the oil (4 times what it used to) in one go and do it very easily under the tongue, without having to use a mirror to ensure one is getting the right number of drops. The easy dropper technology has boosted the good reputation of the already popular cylinder bottles because they’re easy and safe to use wherever you go with no leaking and a very convenient pocket size. Each of their 12g bottles now contains 100 pumps (full doses) of CBD, making it the easiest and most convenient system available, truly suitable for all use, including travel. Visit the CannabiGold collection.
Cannabidiol, or CBD for short, is a natural phyto-cannabinoid (or plant-based chemical compound) found in cannabis plants, including hemp and marijuana. Unlike other cannabinoids — namely tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC — CBD does not produce any psychoactive effects, and will actually counteract these effects to a degree. CBD will induce feelings of sleepiness; for this reason, it can be an effective soporific for people who struggle to fall and/or remain asleep due to insomnia and other sleep disorders.
The method that allows the most absorption is the sublingual application of the oil (under the tongue). Take your drops in front of a mirror (to make sure you get the correct dose) place them under your tongue and keep them there for 2-3 minutes before swallowing the remaining oil with a drink. We recommend following it with breakfast or dinner to further increase absorption (and to get rid of the taste in the back of your throat). Combine it with other CBD products like hemp tea or an e-liquid for an even stronger effect.
It’s also important to select CBD oil products based on your concentration preferences. Some forms of CBD oil – such as vapors and tinctures – normally have higher-than-average concentrations, whereas sprays and topicals tend to have lower concentrations. Remember: higher concentration means more pronounced effects, but not necessarily mean higher quality.
People who experience psychosis may produce too much or even too little cannabinoids (from overactive dopamine receptors). CBD is milder than our internal cannabinoids and helps to re-establish a balance of cannabinoids in the brain. CBD also helps lower inflammation, which is often increased in schizophrenia. THC, on the other hand, is stronger than our internal cannabinoids (anandamide and 2-AG), this way potentially triggering psychosis [46, 48].
Unlike THC, the psychoactive compound which is responsible for giving you that high effect, CBD, is non-psychoactive and a proven aid for nausea, pain, and anxiety (plus, if extracted from industrial hemp, it’s legal). CBD is also known to be anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antispasmodic, cell-regenerative, and anti–cell proliferative for bad cells. This means that CBD is a potential therapy for a range of medical conditions.
Low CBD oil prices isn’t always a good thing, and it is something to watch out for as it’s our natural instinct to go for the lowest price possible. When discussing CBD oil, though, ones that are “abnormally” cheap will probably mean they have a low concentration (remember the Flaxseed analogy?). Prices of quality CBD should range around $50-$90 for a 300mg bottle.

This tincture is processed using the brand’s signature ‘Gold Formula,’ a full spectrum blend of terpenes, phytocannabinoids, fatty acids, and vitamin E. The drops are offered in three concentrations: 250mg in a 1-oz. container, or 750mg and 1,500mg in 2-oz. containers. Plus CBD Oil recommends taking half a dropper, or 15 drops, per dose. The drops are vegetarian-friendly and free of GMOs, gluten, and glycerin.
Oils are hot in the beauty world. As a beauty editor, I’ve slathered everything short of butter onto my face: argan, coconut, rosehip, sandalwood, chia, neroli, calendula, mandarin, macadamia, rice bran, seabuckthorn, patchouli, grapefruit seed, sesame seed, soybean, sweet almond, pomegranate seed, lemon myrtle, sunflower seed—even extra virgin olive oil from my pantry when I was desperate. I’ve washed my face with oil-based cleansers, and dabbed expensive mixtures being sold as “face oils” onto my skin in hopes of achieving that Instagram-ready glow. Contrary to popular belief, the right oil is actually good for your face and won’t clog your pores. Your skin needs a reasonable amount of oil to do its business; as a matter of fact, if you scrub away all your natural face oil (as I was prone to do with rubbing alcohol as a frustrated and misguided pizza-faced teen), you may actually be prone to more breakouts as your skin tries to make up for the imbalance. As cannabis meets up with the mainstream beauty world, cannabidiol (CBD) oil may be the next big thing.
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