Out of all the CBD products I’ve tested and used in the past few weeks, this thick green lemon-vanilla scented salve is my favorite. I massage it onto my sore red knuckles after boxing practice, and if it weren’t so expensive, I would encase my entire body in it. The cannabis sativa seed oil in this salve has antioxidant properties so that your skin can repair itself from the inside out, while the thick balm-like formula protects your skin from environmental aggressors. I would not recommend rubbing this onto your face because it’s so thick, but do whatever you want on the rest of your body—and if your feet are in need of some serious TLC in time for summer sandals weather, consider rubbing this onto your cracked heels and putting on a pair of soft socks before bed. The next morning, you’ll have baby’s feet again.

Extraction: The method by which CBD oil is processed from hemp plants can be very telling. Some manufacturers extract and process the oil using toxic materials like propane or butane; in most cases, these oils are cheaply priced. Safer extraction and processing agents include ethanol, which cleans the hemp plant of unwanted toxins; and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction, which strips harmful materials from the plant by changing the carbon dioxide’s temperature and pressure settings.

Oils are hot in the beauty world. As a beauty editor, I’ve slathered everything short of butter onto my face: argan, coconut, rosehip, sandalwood, chia, neroli, calendula, mandarin, macadamia, rice bran, seabuckthorn, patchouli, grapefruit seed, sesame seed, soybean, sweet almond, pomegranate seed, lemon myrtle, sunflower seed—even extra virgin olive oil from my pantry when I was desperate. I’ve washed my face with oil-based cleansers, and dabbed expensive mixtures being sold as “face oils” onto my skin in hopes of achieving that Instagram-ready glow. Contrary to popular belief, the right oil is actually good for your face and won’t clog your pores. Your skin needs a reasonable amount of oil to do its business; as a matter of fact, if you scrub away all your natural face oil (as I was prone to do with rubbing alcohol as a frustrated and misguided pizza-faced teen), you may actually be prone to more breakouts as your skin tries to make up for the imbalance. As cannabis meets up with the mainstream beauty world, cannabidiol (CBD) oil may be the next big thing.


High-potency CBD oils are most suitable for people experiencing strong, insomnia, chronic aches and pains, anxiety/depression symptoms, and other conditions that necessitate stronger effects. Our top pick for this category is the Lab Grade CBD Oil from Spruce, which comes in a 30mL bottle with a concentration of 2,400mg. Each full dropper of oil contains roughly 80mg of CBD, which can be an effective dose for those with severe discomfort or symptoms.

This is a versatile option because you can mix it with your food or drink, consume it raw, or use a vaporizer. I would recommend being careful when using this CBD isolate for the first time, however, because it is pretty potent. The golden rule of CBD consumption is to begin with a small amount and work your way up until you find the minimum effective dose.
Although CBD oils aren’t regulated by the FDA, purchasing products stateside from one of the nine states where recreational and medical cannabis use is legal will likely result in a higher-quality product than buying one made with hemp-derived CBD oil imported from abroad, says Martin Lee, director of Project CBD, a nonprofit that promotes medical research into CBD.
Out of all the CBD products I’ve tested and used in the past few weeks, this thick green lemon-vanilla scented salve is my favorite. I massage it onto my sore red knuckles after boxing practice, and if it weren’t so expensive, I would encase my entire body in it. The cannabis sativa seed oil in this salve has antioxidant properties so that your skin can repair itself from the inside out, while the thick balm-like formula protects your skin from environmental aggressors. I would not recommend rubbing this onto your face because it’s so thick, but do whatever you want on the rest of your body—and if your feet are in need of some serious TLC in time for summer sandals weather, consider rubbing this onto your cracked heels and putting on a pair of soft socks before bed. The next morning, you’ll have baby’s feet again.
Organic hemp tea releases a full spectrum of cannabinoids that has a different profile to that of the oil. For instance, the CBDa content in hemp tea is naturally higher. Our bestseller is the regular hemp tea and 1.6% loose tea. Free samples of the 1.6% hemp tea bags and loose tea are available whenever you make a purchase over £30 (just add the sample in the ‘cart window’ or tell us in the notes section). The new 4% CBD hemp tea - made with the Futura strain of Cannabis Sativa L. - synergises very well with the strong 20% or the strongest 30% CBD drops. Hemp tea can also be vaporised, smoked or baked with. In 2019, Biopurus is looking to launch a new range of naturally flavoured oils. Visit the Biopurus collection.
Customer Service: There are multiple ways to get in touch with customer service, and Pure Hemp Botanicals’ customer service representatives are both quick to respond and forthcoming with information. On the down side, free shipping kicks in at $100 — otherwise it’s a pricey $9.99 flat rate. And you can return products, but only if they’re unopened.
So is it worth it to buy pure CBD oil or spend the money on a top-shelf product, with no medicinal "guarantee" that it will have therapeutic effects? That's a decision that you'll have to make personally, but let us leave you with this bit of food for thought: as of June 2018, the FDA has approved its first-ever natural CBD extract (Epidiolex) for prescription use, and many have said that this will just be the tip of the iceberg in terms of high-profile health organizations beginning to attest to the true positive qualities of CBD oil and other CBD-based hemp extracts.
Topicals – Topicals are typically salves or creams that have been infused with cannabis or hemp oil. This allows for easy use to treat problem areas. Many senior citizens use topicals for arthritis or other auto-immune disorders however because of restrictions imposed by various agencies we are not allowed to say whether this is an effective treatment or now. However, a quick Google search will help you find what you are looking for in terms of effectiveness.
I think being safe to eat is a moot point. These are topical products. I don’t think anybody is buying to eat them. It’s just a marketing tactic. In regards to the chapsticks, unless you were trying to literally eat the chapstick I think whatever negligible amount may make it past your lips and into your mouth, would certainly not be a health concern from any of these products. What concerns me more is there is zero efficacy with all of these products. Do they just decide over breakfast how much CBD needs to be added for the dosage to work? It’s ridiculous that they are marketing it as safe to eat, and people are buying into that bs and providing no clinical studies or research at all. Just my 2 cents

Success stories like Oliver’s are everywhere, but there’s not a lot of data to back up those results. That’s because CBD comes from cannabis and, like nearly all other parts of the plant, is categorized by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) as a Schedule 1 drug—the most restrictive classification. (Others on that list: heroin, Ecstasy, and peyote.) This classification, which cannabis advocates have tried for years to change, keeps cannabis-derived products, including CBD, from being properly studied in the U.S.


Most human studies of CBD have been done on people who have seizures, and the FDA recently approved the first CBD-based drug, Epidiolex, for rare forms of epilepsy. Clinical trials for other conditions are promising, but tiny. In one Brazilian study published in 2011 of people with generalized social anxiety disorder, for example, taking a 600-mg dose of CBD (higher than a typical dose from a tincture) lessened discomfort more than a placebo, but only a dozen people were given the pill.
Revida Labs oil (tincture is amazing, but expensive. Procana also has good tincture. In terms of CBD products it is important to find a product that is lab tested and willing to show you the lab results that prove they have the amount of CBD in it that they claim. Also make sure they use natural and/or organic ingredients. You don’t want any chemicals in the product. Also, if you can, try to go to a store where they are sold and see if you can try a sample if you are doing a tincture. Some tinctures can taste awful. For psoriasis it can benefit you to take it orally and to put the oil on topically. I use CBD for pain but my twin sister has psoriasis and uses the tincture from Procana for her psoriasis.

Because PharmaHemp’s first business is that of a supplier of raw materials, many of the micro brands you may have come across in Europe and beyond maybe white-labelling PharmaHemp’s CBD oil; in other words, they put their own stamp (branding and packaging) on PharmaHemp’s formulas or requested bespoke formulas. Why not just take it directly from the source? We like dealing with the main supplier directly, particularly in the case of PharmaHemp, who already has a very strong brand identity and ethos. We match their prices and import their products regularly to have the freshest batches of their stock available. Visit the PharmaHemp collection.


A report from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published in the journal Pediatrics cautions pregnant women and nursing mothers to avoid marijuana use due to possible adverse developmental effects to their baby. In a study reviewed for the report, short-term exposure to CBD was found to increase the permeability of the placental barrier, potentially placing the fetus at risk from certain substances.


And now, onto the thorny issue of legality. The simple answer to the question is yes — if it is extracted from hemp. The 2014 Farm Bill established guidelines for growing hemp in the U.S. legally. This so-called “industrial hemp” refers to both hemp and hemp products which come from cannabis plants with less than 0.3 percent THC and are grown by a state-licensed farmer.
To make matters more confusing, nine states (including California, Washington, and Colorado) let residents buy cannabis-based products with or without THC. Nearly two dozen other “medical marijuana states” allow the sale of cannabis, including capsules, tinctures, and other items containing CBD or THC, at licensed dispensaries to people whose doctors have certified that they have an approved condition (the list varies by state but includes chronic pain, PTSD, cancer, autism, Crohn’s disease, and multiple sclerosis). Sixteen more states legalized CBD for certain diseases.

“There's not much more to say than it being perfect at what it is, a high quality lip balm. There is no off taste as I expected, rather it had a mild vanilla earthy taste after being applied. The actual balm is a dark green colour but there is no strange colour on your lips after using it. It doesn't feel greasy at all, it gets quickly absorbed and feels nice and soft after a while. I'd definitely buy some again.”
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