CBD works for everyone in different ways. Certain CBD products, particularly edibles, require longer to work based on metabolism and the natural digestive process, so you may just need to wait a little longer. You may also need to experiment with servings sizes to determine exactly what works best for you. Start low and slow. If you’ve waited a few hours and feel like the CBD isn’t having an effect, very slightly increase your serving size and wait again. This may take some trial and error, but part of the beauty of CBD is the way it allows you to customize your servings and determine exactly how much you need.
Success stories like Oliver’s are everywhere, but there’s not a lot of data to back up those results. That’s because CBD comes from cannabis and, like nearly all other parts of the plant, is categorized by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) as a Schedule 1 drug—the most restrictive classification. (Others on that list: heroin, Ecstasy, and peyote.) This classification, which cannabis advocates have tried for years to change, keeps cannabis-derived products, including CBD, from being properly studied in the U.S.
A report from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published in the journal Pediatrics cautions pregnant women and nursing mothers to avoid marijuana use due to possible adverse developmental effects to their baby. In a study reviewed for the report, short-term exposure to CBD was found to increase the permeability of the placental barrier, potentially placing the fetus at risk from certain substances. 
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